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Happy Hanukkah

7 myths debunked about Hanukkah Jewish holiday

Judaism is one of the ancient religions of the world. The followers are known as Jews. There are so many festivals that Jews celebrate. One of the holiday is Hanukkah. There are so many myths surrounding this holiday that people are generally confused. Here are top 7 myths about Hanukkah busted:

 

What is Hanukkah?

Known as Festival of Lights, Hanukkah starts at sundown december 12th. The name “Hanukkah” derives from the Hebrew verb which means “to dedicate”.

 

Myth #1: Hanukkah is an important jewish holiday

IT is actually one of the least important holiday in the Judaism. The important holidays actually are: Rosh Hashanah, Shavuot, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, and Pesach.

 

Myth #2: Hanukkah is Jewish Christmas

The Festival is actually celebration of rededication of the second Jewish temple after the defeat of Syrian army. It is NOT a Jewish Christmas.

 

Myth #3: The oil burned for 8 days and 8 nights

This story is believed to be created by the Jewish rabbis hundreds of years later.

 

Myth #4: Latkes are a traditional Hanukkah food

Latkes have their origin the Eastern Europe. They do not belong to ancient Israel and are NOT traditional food.

 

Myth #5: It is a necessary that a gift should be given each of the 8 nights of Hanukkah

It’s a nice custom to give gifts, but there’s no religious mandate to do so.

 

Myth #6: On Hanukkiah Jewish families light the menorah

What some people believe is menorah is actually called Hanukkiah. The main difference is that the menorah holds less candles than Hanukkiah.

 

Myth #7: Dreidel is a traditional Jewish game to celebrate the festival

The game of Dreidel was actually a cover up created by the children. This was done when Torah learning was banned and people were forced underground.

 
Some of the major Jew personalities settled in the state of New York are Ari Afilalo, Jack Warner, Woody Allen and more. The present community of Jews in the New York takes pride in their roots and still remain close to them. Want to know more about Jewish customs and holidays? Visit here.